Conductive hearing loss patients have problems hearing due to a problem with their ear’s capacity to conduct sound waves. This can happen because of a congenital absence or malformation of the ear or due to a blockage in the ear canal. Full restoration of hearing is attainable with the correct treatment for many varieties of conductive hearing loss.

Many congenital issues can result in conductive hearing loss. Some individuals are born without an ear canal or with a canal that did not open correctly when they were born. Components inside the ear can be deformed, preventing proper hearing. In some cases these issues can be treated through surgery. Hearing aids can treat other situations where surgery is not appropriate. Conductive hearing loss isn’t commonly caused by congenital issues; other reasons are more probable.

Among the more common causes of conductive hearing loss is an accumulation of wax or fluid in the outer ear. Wax buildup and ear infections can reduce one’s ability to hear clearly. Ear infections are often cured with prescription antibiotics while washing the ear may be sufficient for removing the ear wax buildup.

Middle ear buildup can also lead to conductive hearing loss. Fluid accumulation is the most typical origin of this problem. Young children are particularly susceptible to ear infections, which are a frequent cause of this problem. Sinus pressure from allergies or the common cold can exert pressure on the middle ear, muffling a person’s hearing. A much less common reason for hearing loss in the middle ear is tumors.

Perforated eardrums or foreign bodies in the ear canal are other problems that can be responsible for conductive hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss commonly arises on its own, but it can coincide with other types of hearing loss. You’ll want to consult a hearing care specialist without delay if you,a friend or family member are experiencing inexplicable hearing loss. Hearing ability can often be completely recovered with the proper treatment.